My name's
Danny.

Welcome to my portfolio.

Alright! Let's go.

GIV

an app for social change

Circle

a demo social network

This Website

my portfolio

SkyJS

JavaScript plugin

Esha Shanbhogue

portfolio website

Hyzer Shop

online retail site

Peter Williams

portfolio website

The Property Exchange Company

business website

VFly Travels & Tours

travel agency

This essay I wrote

short essay

Application prototypes

in JS and PHP
GIV

GIV

Developing with purpose

With my personal projects, I tend to do my best work when I really believe in what I'm building. I got the idea for GIV in the midst of learning Angular2, and decided to put it to use to address a question that had been nagging me: Why isn't there a donation site, along the lines of GoFundMe, exclusively focused on the biggest injustices and inequalities of our time? GIV is not a donation site—it's simply a database where organizations can create a page complete with donate links, descriptions, and news updates.

It's official—Angular2 is awesome

This is a MEAN stack app, complete with an Angular2 frontend and an Express/MongoDB backend. Though Angular2 is the star of the show, giving the app a seamless, single-page experience and elegant frontend code, I'm building out the backend to be production-ready, complete with Amazon cloud storage and content delivery, security middleware, and even a rudimentary recommender.

View the project on github

Circle

Circle

I like to bring my ideas to life

‘What if every group of friends had their very own, customizable social network?’ That question inspired me to do something I’d never done before: code a full-stack web app from scratch. With the help of this awesome tutorial and my prior JavaScript skills, I learned the MEAN stack (MongoDB, ExpressJS, AngularJS, and NodeJS), and was able to hack together (emphasis on hack) this very basic social network.

I learn by doing

People are sometimes confused by the fact that I market myself as a UI designer, but I also code. My answer is pretty simple: I like to practice my craft, and I like that practice to be as realistic as possible. I also like to understand the whole picture when it comes to web and product design. I can’t think of a better way to do those things than by learning how to hack together an app and using it to put my UI/UX design chops to the test.

View the project on github

This Website

This Website

Design should have depth

Flat design has been a trend for the last several years, but there’s been another one emerging alongside it, equally important but less obvious: designing the illusion of three dimensions. Parallax has taken hold as the most popular tool for creating depthy interfaces, but with my portfolio site, I wanted to test the limits of CSS’s and JavaScript’s ability to create an experience that feels more truly three-dimensional.

A personal experience

I wanted this site to really stand out in terms of user experience, so I created some simple personalization logic to tailor the experience to one of three audiences: prospective employers, prospective clients, and everyone else. You’ll also be welcomed back with an audience-specific message when you reload the page, and skip right to the skills menu (which varies slightly based on audience).

SkyJS

SkyJS

A sky full of stars

SkyJS is my first object-oriented JavaScript plugin, and the result of years of fascination with both JavaScript and the cosmos. What’s cooler than visualizing yourself soaring through space, past clusters of stars and galaxies? I wanted to bring that fantasy to the web for anyone to play with or use as part of a rich user experience.

See it on GitHub
Esha Shanbhogue

Esha Shanbhogue

Having web design in your repertoire means that your significant other is, at one time or another, going to ask you for a website. And I’m glad she did, because after several weeks of collaboration and iteration, we ended up putting out a pretty cool portfolio site for Esha’s job search.

A grungy, painted look

gets across the idea that Esha isn’t afraid to get her hands dirty.

A single-page site

All the content appears on one page, making the user experience simple and seamless (albeit with some animation lag on older machines). Lazy-loading images keeps page load times nice and short, allowing users to begin interacting with the site while some of the larger images load in the background.

Completely custom

I didn’t feel like a CMS like WordPress was necessary for such a small, highly custom job, but I wanted some scalability and maintainability, so I built the site using PHP, which makes for more DRY (Don’t Repeat Yourself) code and easier editing (though I did not build out a backend UI). All icons and artwork were custom-designed for this site.

Hyzer Shop

Hyzer Shop

I co-founded an online retail store

In spring of 2015, a coworker approached me with an idea for an online retail business. The following February, Armando and I launched Hyzer Shop, a small retail operation based in Armando’s apartment.

It was hard

Hyzer Shop was a daunting project—not just because it was the first e-commerce site I’d ever developed, but because a lot was at stake. I invested significant time and money in the idea that we could establish ourselves as industry leaders in the young online retail space of a rapidly-growing sport. So it's no accident that Hyzer Shop's online presence feels bigger than a two-man operation. A key differentiator from a UI standpoint is our 'In The Bag' page, which I built from scratch to allow users to save a wish list (or ‘bag’) of golf discs (organized by disc type—putter, midrange, and driver).

Peter Williams

Peter Williams

Renowned Delaware painter

and art professor Peter Williams needed a simple, elegant website to act as an archive and gallery of his work. Its minimalism aims to keep the visitor’s attention on the paintings (though Williams’s vibrant style needs no help drawing a viewer’s eye), but I still wanted to give the site itself a style that reflects that of the paintings. Hopefully, the site captures some amount of the color and cheekiness of Williams’s work. What it doesn’t capture is the deeply political, often dark, meaning within his brushstrokes.

Powered by WordPress

and the Portfolio Press theme, the site features custom improvements like a full-screen menu and category navigation on posts.

The Property Exchange Company

The Property Exchange Company

Ann Arbor-based Attorney

Karen Mendelson is a good family friend, and she needed a website for her legal business. The company deals in something called a 1031 Exchange, the details of which I won’t bore you with—ah, but therein lies the rub. How do you make nap-inducing legalese palattable for a website visitor?

Learn as much or as little as you want

The site is meant to provide as much or as little information as the visitor wants to see. The homepage provides a quick summary with icons as visual aides and clear calls to action. Click on ‘Services’ and you’ll get the full rundown on what a 1031 exchange is and how it works. And, of course, an easily-accessible contact form lets you begin the process right away.

VFly Travels & Tours

VFly Travels & Tours

As one of my first

freelance web development gigs, VFly had a very basic user interface that I’m still proud of. While it’s a bit rough around the edges, it actually lets me show off a variety of skills, including illustration, sound web design practices, copy writing and editing, and an ability to work with a client to realize their specific vision. In the age of online bookings, Akila Dharmarajan (VFly’s sole proprietor) wanted her agency to feel as user-friendly as her automated competitors, while highlighting the personal touch that you get with a real-life agent. The ‘Where would you like to go?’ field shows a different popular destination on each page load, and the brief form expands only when the user shows interest by focusing on it. Plug in your travel plans, click ‘send,’ and Akila will give you a call to get your plans rolling, making the travel possibilities feel the way they should: limitless.

This essay I wrote

This essay I wrote

My English degree wasn’t entirely useless,

although I’ll admit I don’t write many essays these days. Sometimes, however, I’ll suddenly get interested in a topic and spend hours on Wikipedia and YouTube, and occasionally those hours will result in something other than sleep-deprived yawns of regret. In this case, they resulted in a short essay on memetics. It’s a decent look at my written communication skills, and hey, if you read some of it, you might even learn what the heck memetics is.

Application prototypesApplication prototypes

Application prototypes

At Magnetic, I make a habit of hacking together prototypes for improvements to our processes and products whenever I can.

Client-facing UI

Our implementations team had a problem. Getting information from the clients that we needed to implement them on our products was time-consuming and difficult. My team was tasked with designing a PDF form to send to clients that would make this process easier, but I figured that since the plan was to eventually replace that PDF with a cloud-based UI, I should get started with conceptualizing how that experience would look and feel. What I ended up doing was designing a simple yet powerful prototype that could be used as a model for virtually any situation in which we would need to collect information from a client. Saving form data in cookies, and allowing our team to pre-fill values within the query string, this working prototype could send an email containing all the filled-out data directly to the appropriate member of our team, providing a temporary (but good-looking) solution to our data collection woes.

WYSIWYG Email Banner Designer

Working on that team, I designed countless marketing emails for clients. Too often, clients would need to request a creative change just to change a word or number in the copy of their banner. By far the uglier of the two ducklings shown here, this ‘prototype’ is really more of a proof-of-concept. Using PHP to update the styling of a div, and the hacky but fantastic HTML2Canvas library, I was able to show the feasibility of a tool with which clients could design, and make changes to, their own email banners.

Me at my luckiest: on a boatThanks for the visit.

My name's Danny. I design and build interfaces for the web, and I run on inspiration. When I have it, or am lucky enough to share it, I work until it's finished—period. An inspired vision will give all the other things—television, sleep, books, natural light—serious competition for shares of my time. From music composition to graphic design to web development, my passion for creative work only grows with time, and my technical toolkit grows with it. My undergrad studies were in English, so I’m a solid writer as well. But more importantly, I've learned that good communication, written or visual, is never one-sided or one-dimensional. That's why I designed this site to embody, in some small way, the interactivity and depth of a one-on-one conversation.

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